‘Generation Nine’

  1. Jorgen Kaas til Hastrup

    June 21, 2013

    Jorgen Kaas til Hastrup
    c 1619-1658

    Son of  Hans Andersen KAAS and Birgitte NORDBY

    Husband of  Karen Jorgensdatter GRUBBE

    Father of  Hans Kaas til Hastrup

    (more…)


  2. Karen Jorgensdatter Grubbe

    July 5, 2013

    Karen Jorgensdatter Grubbe
    19 Jan 1616 –  23 Mar 1695

    Daughter of  Jorgen GRUBBE and Lene Knudsdatter RUD

    Wife of  Jørgen KAAS

    Mother of  Hans Jorgensen Kaas til Hastrup

    Karen Jorgensdatter Grubbe was born in Halsted Kloster, Næstved, Denmark. The Grubbe family was widespread and powerful and among the oldest and most noble families in Denmark. The Grubbes coat-of-arms originated in the 13th century.

    Lystrup

    Lystrup

    Karen was the granddaughter of Eiler Grubbe who took over the post of Treasurer in 1560  and was appointed 10 years later as Realm Chancellor, which office he held with honor and skill to his death. He holds various lucrative vasalries and kanonikater. In  1579 he rebuilt his ancestral farm Lystrup

     in Renaissance style.

    Her father’s half-brother was Sivert Grubbe, famous during the reign of Christian IV, of whom he was a close friend. He accompanied him on one of his voyages to Norway and wrote a diary with important information concerning the King. Her sister, Regitze, was married to  Hans Ulrik Gyldenløve son of King Christian IV.

    Karen was a distant cousin of Marie Grubbe. Marie was married to Ulrik Frederik Gyldenløve, the son of King Frederick III of Denmark. Marie was divorced and married another two times. The life and loves of Marie Grubbe have inspired several books, an opera, a play and a TV mini-series. Hans Christian Andersen wrote about her in his story Chicken Greta’s Family.


    Children: 
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    1. Hans Jorgensen Kaas til HASTRUP,   b. 1657, Velling, Ringkobing, Denmark
    2. Jorgen Grubbe KAAS,   b. 22 Jan 1643
    3. Ulrik KAAS,   b. Between 1640 and 1658

     


     

     


  3. Henrik Bjelke

    July 5, 2013

    Henrik Bjelke
    1615 – 1683

    Son of Jens Bjelke and Sophie Brockenhuus

    Husband of Edel Christoffersdatter Ulfeldt

    Father of Sophie Amalie Bielke

    Henrik Bjelke (13. January 1615 – 16. March 1683) was a Danish-Norwegian officer and for a period the highest authority over the Danish navy. He was the son of Chancellor Jens Bjelke, and brother of General Jørgen Bjelke and Chancellor Ove Bjelke.

    At the age of 18 years, Henrik Bjelke went on an educational journey abroad, studied in Padua and received military training in Holland under Frederick Henry of Orange. His first service was with Prince Frederik Hendrik of the Netherlands, where he was an officer in 1640. The same title was awarded him by King Christian IV, who appointed him to Major while he was still in the Netherlands.

    Knight Henrik Bjelke

    Knight Henrik Bjelke

    In February, 1644 he returned to Denmark. From there he was sent to Norway to serve with the then Danish statesman and Governor of Norway,  Hannibal Sehested. He fought against the Swedes in the Torstenson War. After,  in 1645, he went to Holland where he served with the Danish statesman Corfitz Ulfeldt. He was knighted on his return to Denmark.

    During the Torstenson War  he served in 1644 as Flagoffizier on the side of his king Christian IV both in the naval battle of Kolberg Heath and in the ensuing Battle of Fehmarn in Norway and served as a captain or colonel of then Danish statesman and Governor of Norway, Hannibal Sehested.  In 1648, he fought as a volunteer under Peter Melander of Holzappel in Germany against Sweden. On his return to Denmark he was made a  Knight of the Order of the Elephant by Danish King Frederick III.

    His military career was still on the rise, when in 1653 he left the military for a period. But was soon in combat again when the Karl-Gustav wars broke out in 1657. He was then appointed Vice Riksadmiral, and participated in several battles in the Baltic Sea. As a new realm Vice Admiral (Rigsviceadmiral)  Bjelke commanded,  together with Admiral Niels Juel and the Dutch Admiral Michiel de Ruyter , the Danish fleet during a renewed war against Sweden from 1657 to 1660, as Reich Admiral Ove Gjedde had fallen in Swedish captivity. Bjelke participated in the naval battle in the Øresund part, fought with varying fortune against the Swedish Admiral Clas Bjelkenstjerna and distinguished himself at Falsterbo, Rödsand and the war for Fyn.

    In the extension of his military career he was also a political power, and was appointed to the Riksråd in 1660.  He supported Frederik III’s introduction of eneveldets . In 1660, he was president of the Admiralty College, Imperial Council and in 1662 he was appointed as Riksadmiral (literally admiral of the empire), as well as a member of Statskollegiet and the Supreme Court.  When the war ended in 1679 resigned due to his advanced age, in the meantime, the office of the Riksadmiral  had become meaningless and was abolished after his death.
    He was a loyal friend of Corfitz Ulfeldt ( a second cousin, once removed, of his wife) and Leonora Christina Ulfeldt, wife of Corfitz and daughter of the daughter of King Christian IV of Denmark, which might have weakened his position. In the Skånske war he had no command, but was kept in an administrative function in Copenhagen. In 1679 he left Admiralitetet because of age.
    In 1649 Henrik Bjelke  married the Danish nobility Edel Christoffersdatter Ulfeldt (1630-1676), with her he had two sons. At the beginning of the 18th Century they both fell while fighting with the French during the Spanish War of Succession. Christopher dies at the Battle of Höchstedt in 1704 and Christian died in Quaregnon a few days after the Battle of Malplaquet in  1709.  His daughter, Sophie Marie (1657-1686) was married in 1680 to Vice Admiral Christian Bjelke, a distant cousin, after her death Christian Bjelke married a  daughter of Admiral Niels Juel.

    Henrik is descended from some of the most noble and prominent families of Denmark. His grandparents were Ove Jenssen Bielke, Margrethe Clausdatter Thott, Henrik Brockenhuus and Dorthe Neilsdatter Juel. His great-grandmothers included Lucie Nielsdatter Gyldenløve, Kirstine Eriksdatter Gyldenhorn and Christence Lunge. Other ancestors included members of the families Banner, Bild, Friis, Krabbe, Rosenkrantz, Gyldenstierne and Skram.


    Children: 
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    1. Sophie Amalie BIELKE,   b. 1650, Ellinggård, Astraat, Rogaland, Norway
    2. Christopher BIELKE,   b. 1654
    3. Maren Sophie BIELKE,   b. 1657
    4. Beate MARGRETHE,   b. 1662
    5. Christian Frederik CHRISTIAN,   b. 1670

  4. Edel Christoffersdatter Ulfeldt

    July 6, 2013

    Edel Christoffersdatter Ulfeldt
    15 Mar 1650- 10 Jan 1676

    Daughter of Christoffer ULFELDT and Maren Ovesdatter URUP

    Wife of Henrik Bjelke

    Mother of Sophie Amalie Bielke

    Edel’s ancestors were among some of the most prominent and noble families in Denmark. Her Grandparents were Knud Ebbesen Ulfeldt, Beate Christoffersdatter Huitfeldt, Ove Ovessen Urup and Kirsten Kaas (af Sparre). Among her ancestors were the families Banner, Friis, Linde, Skram, Saltensee, Juel, Lunge, Munk , Lovenbalk. Krabbe and Glob Due.

    Her parents, Christoffer Ulfeldt and Margrethe Urup had twelve children, of whom Edel’s brother, Björn,  inherited Råbelöv when his father died  in 1653.  Like other sons of the nobility, he had a solid upbringing. After studies at the Knights Academy in Soro, he had made long trips abroad and then come into service at court. He had been a commander in Landskrona and Helsingborg and held Lysekloster in Norway fiefdom. When he died in 1656  he had only one surviving son who was ten years old, by his marriage with Margrete Brahe.

    Björn’s son died unmarried seven years later and Råbelöv then went to his uncle, the renowned Ebbe Ulfeldt . Ebbe was married to Countess Hedwig of Schleswig-Holstein, the daughter of Christian IV and his second wife, Kirsten Munk. Like his relative, and brother-Corfitz Ulfeldt, who was married to Countess Leonora Christine, Ebbe was not popular with Frederik III and his wife Sophie Amalie. He was removed as overlord on Bornholm for cruelty and exploitation of the population and fled to Sweden in 1652. There he was in the same year Major General in the cavalry, and after the conclusion of peace in 1660 he made a career in the new home country and was elected councilor and judge in Östergötland.
    During the Scanian War in 1675-79,   Karl XI strengthened Råbelöv with ramparts, tombs and fences to protect his army, which had winter quarters in the area. Fortifications are visible on Buhrmans drawing of the farm. snapphanar (briggands, who roamed the forest lands) during this war, were a constant scourge for the Swedish Armed Forces . In the fight against them Ebbe Ulfeldt was known for his grim methods. His specialty was impaling captured snapphanar live on stilts, as the coccyx was threaded up under the back skin and into the neck. The victim was then hanging on the gallows until he died, which at worst could take several days.

    Her grandfather Ove Ovessen Urup was the owner of  Ovesholms castle

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    Children: 
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    1. Sophie Amalie BIELKE,   b. 1650, Ellinggård, Astraat, Rogaland, Norway
    2. Christopher BIELKE,   b. 1654
    3. Maren Sophie BIELKE,   b. 1657
    4. Beate MARGRETHE,   b. 1662
    5. Christian Frederik CHRISTIAN,   b. 1670